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What will Tech look like without technology?

September 24, 2015
Devin Baize, a junior mathematics major, reads as he takes a break from using all electronic devices for six hours.

Devin Baize, a junior mathematics major, reads as he takes a break from using all electronic devices for six hours. – Photo by Frededreia Willis

 

FREDEDREIA WILLIS
Staff Reporter

 

In today’s world, technology is the fastest moving process next to the source of light. Its fast methods and techniques are on such a rise it is hard to imagine going through the day-to-day routine without it.

 

But one Louisiana Tech student stepped up to the plate and accepted the challenge to go “tech-less.”

 

Devin Baize, a junior mathematics major, went six hours without technology and said the hardest thing during the challenge was not being able to grab knowledge when he needed to.

 

“I was reading a book during the time I was tech-less and would come across words I did not know and could not access the meaning as quickly as I would normally be able to,” he said.

 

Baize said, as a student, technology is both positive and negative depending on the use.

 

He said having access to the Internet all the time could be distracting for students because everything they need for entertainment is so readily available.

 

On a positive note, it is very useful to have teacher assistance and textbook material readily available when it is needed.

 

“You can always email your teachers, there is plenty of material online to help you with homework you do not understand,” Baize said. “You can even watch online lectures you may have missed in class. I use technology all day long from the dorm room to the classroom; it can be a distraction, but it makes life easier from some perspectives.”

 

StatsHe said technology is inevitable because humans will always want to make things easier for themselves.

 

When thinking about technology, engineering and mathematics students are often brought up, but even faculty express their dire need of it as well.

 

Amy Yates, director of the School of Human Ecology, said their department recognize technology as an item penetrating through how a community functions, how a family functions and even how an individual functions.

 

“We see it as our obligation to make sure our students are aware of the influences and the effects of technology on lives,” Yates said. “We will continue to teach our students on how to use and seek the best technology to deliver their services.”

 

She said they are always looking for ways to teach students how to improve family lives and could not do so without today’s technology.

 

Though some students could easily accept the challenge and push themselves out of the 21st century, others like Brock Malbrough, a junior mechanical engineering major, had no choice but to remain in touch.

 

“The only reason I could not go without technology for a day is because of my academics,” Malbrough said. “My major requires me to do a lot of online course work, which is the only reason I can not go a substantial amount of time without technology, even though I would like to.”

 

He said 15 years from now, if technology keeps going in the direction it is, we may not even have paper; everything will be strictly electronically and Internet accessible.

 

Malbrough said for the upcoming generation the world is definitely going to be a lot faster and their technology may be even better than what is available today.

 

Which he describes as amazing and mind-blowing because of what it already allows people to do and accomplish.

 

“As technology increases we are open to all of the knowledge in the world,” he said. “And with the increases comes more opportunities, but also more distractions and difficulties depending on how it is handled by people.”

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