FacebookTwitterRSS

The extinction behind the QB

April 10, 2014

 

TRAHAN

TRAHAN

WILL TRAHAN
Staff Reporter

 

With the feature running back role in a NFL offense endangered, is it crazy to think that it will soon be extinct?

 

With the high-flying offenses of today’s NFL, the running back position is taking a backseat to the receiver and tight end positions.

 

Players like Ben Tate and Knowshon Moreno got paid little more than punter money when both players had great years with their former teams last year.

 

Adrian Peterson and Marshawn Lynch may be the last of their kind.

 

If you watch any of the major sports media outlets, you will hear the experts saying make sure your kid is a receiver or quarterback.

 

The new methods that offensive coordinators and head coaches use focuses on great quarterback play with play making receivers.

 

The next focus is the offensive line to protect the quarterback and last and certainly least, the running back to slow down the game.

 

This does not make sense because the running back is the only position on offense that every single person on the defense is looking to hit.

 

The running back position requires the player to get hit or deliver a hit on a player that most likely is bigger than him.

 

As to almost anything in sports, there are exceptional

people at their position and Peterson may be the most exceptional player in the NFL despite his position.

 

He has kept the hope that there still is a spot for workhorse running backs in the NFL.

 

In 2012, Peterson came off a year where he rushed for 2,000 yards nearly 10 months after surgery to repair a torn ACL.

 

That kind of talent is hard to find and it is even more impressive that defenses would game plan around him, due to the quarterback carousel that went on in Minnesota last year.

 

The National Football League is moving to a running back by committee style of play and it is taking away from the individual accomplishments of the players themselves.

 

If the position becomes extinct, then the game will have lost something that was a huge part of what made it so great.

 

Will Trahan is a junior journalism major from Delhi. Email comments to bwt008@LaTech.edu

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *