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Tech students speak out on Charlie Hebdo office attacks

January 23, 2015

 

Attendees of a rally in support of the victims of two terrorists attacks on French soil gather in New York’s Washington Square Park with signs that proclaim “Je Suis Charlie (I am Charlie)-AP Photo/Jason DeCrow

Attendees of a rally in support of the victims of two terrorists attacks on French soil gather in New York’s Washington Square Park with signs that proclaim “Je Suis Charlie (I am Charlie)-AP Photo/Jason DeCrow

KAILEE COURTS

Staff Reporter

 

The city of Paris stood still last week after a terrorist attack.

 

The French government said it was a radical Islamist group who attacked the offices of the satirical newspaper “Charlie Hebdo.”

 

Twelve people were killed and 11 were injured in the attack.

 

The news of the attack shocked people around the world including French students at Tech.

 

Arthur Manahade, a freshman computer science major, said he found out about the news via Facebook.

 

“I do not know how to describe what I was feeling,” he said. “It was hard to believe at first because the terrorists were French citizens.”

 

Valery Junique, a French teaching assistant, did not want to believe the news when he saw it.

 

“Every morning, I wake up and read the news from France,” he said. “When I read about the attacks, all I could do was cry.”

 

Junique said this is not something that happens in France.

 

“This was the first time in history this has happened,” he said. “It was an attack on our freedom.”

 

While there were students concerned about what was happening in France, some students were concerned about America’s reaction to the event.

 

Tiffany Easter, a sophomore political science major, said she thinks the U.S. needs to address what happened.

 

“We are allies with France and I think we should show our respect,” she said. “Our president did not join the other leaders in France.”

 

Easter said she thinks President Barack Obama is just dancing around the topic of radical Islam.

 

“Us not saying anything makes it look like we are unconcerned with our allies,” Easter said. “I really think we should show some support.”

 

Junique said although what happened was a tragedy, the French people are now rallying together.

 

“There is the whole ‘Je suis Charlie’ thing,” he said. “It means ‘I am Charlie’ but it does not just represent the newspaper, it represents the French people as a whole and we are in this together.”

 

Four million French citizens walked the streets of Paris for peace Sunday.

 

Junique said this is the first time in history where the French are uniting for a cause like this.

 

“People did not even celebrate like this after the second world war,” he said. “It just shows how strong the French really are.”

 

Junique said even though the event is a big deal, the only thing they can do now is move on.

 

“This whole thing just shows that people can attack us, but we will not change for them,” he said.

 

Email comments to kec029@latech.edu.

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