FacebookTwitterRSS

Students get their TWIRP on

May 14, 2015

 

From left, Danny Richardson, a sophormore ag business major; Lauren Clayborn, a senior family and child studies major; Brandon Bowles, a senior mechanical engineering major; and Catherine Champa junior businesss management major, got creative for BCM’s TWIRP dance May 8 dressed as Olympic figurines–Photo by Colin Fontenot

From left, Danny Richardson, a sophormore ag business major; Lauren Clayborn, a senior family and child studies major; Brandon Bowles, a senior mechanical engineering major; and Catherine Champa junior businesss management major, got creative for BCM’s TWIRP dance May 8 dressed as Olympic figurines–Photo by Colin Fontenot

CALEB DANIEL 

Staff Reporter

 

When considering a Friday night dance party, one would probably not think of a Baptist collegiate ministry as a venue.

 

Yet a dance party was exactly what took place at the Louisiana Tech BCM on May 8.

 

As part of the ministry’s “The Woman is Required to Pay” (TWIRP) week, this Sadie-Hawkins-esque event provided students with three hours of music and food.

 

Angelle Campbell, associate director of the BCM, said the events of TWIRP week are supposed to help give girls a safe place to get to know the boys on campus.

 

“We’re encouraging girls to invite boyfriends, friends or guys they don’t know very well to these events as a chance to get to know each other better,” she said. “We want to increase community and kill the awkwardness of a formal dance setting.”

 

With a theme titled “Your America,” the festivities included members of BCM leadership painted in gold and posing for pictures as Olympic gold medalists.

 

Students were encouraged to come dressed in anything that resembles what America means to them. The results included pitchfork-wielding farmers, baseball players and women in the “typical white girl look,” Starbucks cup included.

 

One of the more creative getups belonged to Kelsie Miller, who came dressed as the Liberty Bell. A sophomore family and child studies major, Miller arrived with her boyfriend, who was dressed as a bald eagle.

 

“Even though it may seem like a pretty specific theme, it’s being interpreted so broadly with the costumes,” she said. “It just shows the diversity of our country.”

 

Campbell said the BCM hosts dances because dancing is a way students often like to express themselves.

 

“We have the opportunity to present students with uplifting and encouraging music that they can move to without being suggestive,” she said. “Just to have a great time.”

 

Tyler Pitson, a freshman mechanical engineering major, said the dance offered some needed variety to his college life.

 

“I’m enjoying having something different to do, just hanging out and dancing and having a good time,” he said. “Plus, I didn’t have to pay.”

 

Rachel Gautreaux was the one doing the paying. A freshman chemical engineering major, Gautreaux jokingly said her asking Tyler to the dance was simply an act of kindness.

“I asked him out of pity,” she said.

 

Gautreaux said the environment of the event made it easy to let loose and have fun.

 

“Absolutely none of us can dance,” she said. “But no one judges here.”

 

Email comments to csd020@latech.edu.

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *