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Poet pushes new publication

May 8, 2014

 

Darrel Bourque signs a copy of his book “Megan’s Guitar and Other Poems from Acadie.” In an interview with Poetry matters blog, Borque said his favorite poems in the book were “Sunday Afternoons Behind T-Maurice’s Dancehall” and “Agnés as Memory. – Photo by Colin Fontenot

Darrel Bourque signs a copy of his book “Megan’s Guitar and Other Poems from Acadie.” In an interview with Poetry matters blog, Borque said his favorite poems in the book were “Sunday Afternoons Behind T-Maurice’s Dancehall” and “Agnés as Memory.
– Photo by Colin Fontenot

Darrel Bourque, Louisiana’s former poet laureate, visits Louisiana Tech

 

WILL TRAHAN
Staff Reporter

Darrell Bourque, a former poet laureate for Louisiana, hosted a talk on his new books for Louisiana Tech students in GTM on Apr. 29.

He came to Tech to talk to students about his latest published work, “Megan’s Guitar and Other Poems from Acadie.”

Bourque is from south Louisiana, and his Cajun roots have been the inspiration for his latest work.

“I think every artist has to find out what they are rooted in before they can diversify in their work,” Bourque said.

Bourque is from St. Landry Parish and graduated from then-University of Southwestern Louisiana (now Louisiana-Lafayette) and then went on to get his masters and a Ph.D. at Florida State University.

“I can not imagine any artist not learning their routes before they start writing about any culture,” Bourque said.

Before Bourque addressed  the general public, he sat down and talked to Sigma Tau Delta, the English honor society.

He discussed upcoming projects and gave them some inside looks at his way of thinking.

“I think the work that he is doing is so important in preserving the Creole culture that is so big in the south,” said Emily Traylor, a senior English and Spanish double major.

Bourque has been working on a project to set up a statue or some sort of memorial for musician Amédé Ardoin.

SMITH

SMITH

Ardoin was a creole musician who was killed in Pineville Mental Institution and was buried in an unmarked grave.

“I would like to create some sort of commemoration to him for all he did for the culture,” Bourque said.

Bourque would want the commemoration to be sent back to his hometown of Eunice.

“His ability to record his family history and the history of the Cajun people impressed me,” said Genaro Smith, an English professor at Louisiana Tech.

Smith said that Bourque should come back to Tech next year because he is prolific and could set up a workshop here.

Bourque will also be receiving the Louisiana Writer of the Year Award for his work.

“ I believe in hard work and getting the award was not the hard work; finishing my book was the hard work,” Bourque said.

Email comments to bwt008@latech.edu.

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