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New title raises tension

September 26, 2013

 

Miss Tech weighs in on recent controversy

 

CODY SEXTON
Staff Reporter

 

Miss New York Nina Davuluri walks down the runway after winning the the Miss America 2014 pageant, Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013, in Atlantic City, N.J. - Associated Press

Miss New York Nina Davuluri walks down the runway after winning the the Miss America 2014 pageant, Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013, in Atlantic City, N.J. – Associated Press

For the second consecutive year, the contestant representing New York in the Miss America pageant was crowned the winner.

 

Nina Davuluri was crowned Miss America by her predecessor, Mallory Hagan.

 

This made her the first Indian-American to be crowned.

 

“I was the first Indian Miss New York and now I’m so proud to be the first Indian Miss America,” Davuluri said after she was crowned.

 

However, while Davuluri celebrated her victory, many viewers who were dissatisfied with the results took to the Internet to express their shock and outrage at a “foreigner” being crowned Miss America.

 

“This is America. Not India,” @sarawhitton tweeted.

 

Davuluri, whose father came to America 30 years ago, was born in Syracuse.

 

Others mistook Davuluri for a Muslim and claimed to be offended the judges would crown someone they believed to be from the Middle East only days after the 12th anniversary of Sept. 11.

 

“#MissAmerica ummm wtf?! Have we forgotten 9/11?” tweeted @anthonytkr.

 

Davuluri’s talent portion of the contest was a Bollywood dance number.

 

This shocked viewers who referred to the dance as an “Egypt dance,” though Egypt is 3,000 miles away from India.

 

Many were in support of Miss Kansas, Theresea Vail, an army veteran who enjoys hunting and was not shy about showing off tattoos.

 

Vail was the contestant many believed to be the “true” representation of what it means to be Miss America.

 

However, Davuluri brushed the negative comments aside.

 

“I have to rise above that,” she said. “I always viewed myself first and foremost American.”

 

Lauren Vizza, a senior political science and history major who was crowned Miss Louisiana 2012, said Davuluri has responded well to the racial tension.

 

“She’s been amazing and handled herself so well,” Vizza said. “She’s very well spoken and very smart.”

 

Vizza also said Davuluri has the chance to be a role model for other Indian-American girls since she won.

 

“She can show other girls they don’t all have to come from the same mold to win,” she said.

 

Bijoya Chakraborty, coordinator for the International Student and Scholar Services, said students who have come to Louisiana Tech from India were excited for Daluvuri’s win.

 

“They were happy to see someone with family from their country win,” she said. “It’s good to see diversity.”

 

Email comments to cls068@latech.edu

 

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