FacebookTwitterRSS

Memoirs of a great production

April 30, 2015

 

The actors of Louisiana Tech’s Stone Theatre brought 1930s Brooklyn to Howard Auditorium in their version of Neil Simon’s play.  The New York Daily News regarded Brighton Beach Memoirs as the “funniest, richest and consequently the most affecting of his plays.” – Photos by Colin Fontenot

The actors of Louisiana Tech’s Stone Theatre brought 1930s Brooklyn to Howard Auditorium in their version of Neil Simon’s play. The New York Daily News regarded Brighton Beach Memoirs as the “funniest, richest and consequently the most affecting of his plays.” – Photos by Colin Fontenot

BLAKE BRANCH
Staff Reporter

 

The Louisiana Tech School of the Performing Arts held the first leg of performances for its spring main stage production, “Brighton Beach Memoirs” by Neil Simon, over April 22-25.

 

Directed by professor of playwriting, Kenneth Robbins, the play is driven forward by Eugene Morris Jerome, a young teen in Brooklyn who dreams of inappropriately caressing his cousin and playing for the New York Yankees.

 

The play follows the Jerome family, Eugene’s Aunt Blanche and her two daughters, as they struggle to cope with each other’s problems.

 

Playing the lead role of Eugene was freshman theater major Collin Cagle.

 

Cagle was the play’s unquestionable highlight, delivering hilarity all night.

 

Actors do an excellent job performingThe exchange between him and his brother Stanley, played by junior theater major Johnny Marley, where Stanley helps Eugene through his first wet dream and the process of “whacking off” was hysterical.

 

He may have stumbled over a couple lines, but Marley’s performance was admirable.

 

The role of Blanche Morton, Eugene’s aunt, was played by theater major Olivia Louise Wilcox.

 

Wilcox was solid throughout. Her character dealt with the emotional issues of moving on following her husband’s death and raising two young daughters.

 

Kate Jerome, Eugene’s mother, played by Stephanie Hart, was the most annoying character of the bunch.

 

This is not an insult, but rather a complement for how well she portrayed the Jewish mother in charge of policing the home while her husband Jack is always at work.

 

Trey Clark, a second year graduate student of theater at Tech, played a convincing Jack Jerome.

 

Actors do an excellent job performingEmilia Meinert, a first year theater major, was adequate in her theatre debut as Laurie Morton, Eugene’s youngest cousin.

 

Courtney VanEaton played the part of Nora Morton, Blanche’s oldest daughter and the apple of Eugene’s budding sexual eye.

 

VanEaton, a junior theater major, was excellent as Nora.

 

She was outspoken, intriguing and emotional with each stage sequence, matching the brilliance brought by Cagle.

 

All things considered, the play was exceptional. The jokes were never forced, but kept coming in waves and everything from the 1930s costume design to the stage lighting accentuated the acting.

 

Take a bow for a job well done, cast and crew.

 

Email comments to mbb029@latech.edu.

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *