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Louisiana goes to runoff elections

November 6, 2014
Mary Landrieu, is one of the remaining competitors in the Louisiana Senate race. The two will face off in a runoff election on Dec. 6– Photo courtesy of AP

Mary Landrieu, is one of the remaining competitors in the Louisiana Senate race. The two will face off in a runoff election on Dec. 6– Photo courtesy of AP

John Sadler

Editor-in-Chief

 

While the Republicans claimed the Senate majority with their highest numbers since World War II, Louisiana’s case was not so cut and dry.

 

Neither incumbent Sen. Mary Landrieu (D) or challenger U.S. Rep. Bill Cassidy (R) achieved enough of the vote to gain the majority.

 

Landrieu got 42.08 percent of the vote while Cassidy got 40.96 percent. Rob Maness, another Republican, came in third with 13.76 percent.

 

Louisiana’s primary elections are a “jungle primary,” in which all candidates run in the election, but the winner must have a majority of the votes.

 Bill Cassidy is one  the remaining competitors in the Louisiana Senate race. The two will face off in a runoff election on Dec. 6– Photo courtesy of AP

Bill Cassidy is one the remaining competitors in the Louisiana Senate race. The two will face off in a runoff election on Dec. 6– Photo courtesy of AP

 

The fact that neither candidate gained a 50 percent majority in the jungle primary election means a runoff election must be held.

 

Landrieu has held the seat since 1996, but Republican’s increased efforts to attach her to President Obama, who has high disapproval ratings, might be her undoing in a runoff election.

 

Landrieu will have a hard time courting new voters. The majority of voters who did not cast their ballots for either Landrieu or Cassidy voted for Maness, another Republican, and they are not likely to switch over to a Democrat.

 

Cassidy has served as the representative from Louisiana’s 6th Congressional District since 2009. He has voted with his party on key issues, including supporting bills that limit abortion access and opposing the Affordable Care Act. He will have a much easier time courting Maness’ voters to him.

 

The 5th Congressional District is also going into a runoff between Jamie Mayo (D), the current mayor of Monroe, and Ralph Abraham (R), a medical doctor with no previous political experience.

 

Mayo has served as Monroe’s mayor since 2001, and has 10 city budget surpluses and a $14 million dollar fund balance under his belt.

 

He will still have a tough time courting voters in the 5th District, which traditionally votes Republican. The district has not had a Democrat since Rep. Rodney Alexander switched parties in 2004.

 

Abraham is a physician and veteran from Mangham who serves on the Coast Guard Auxilary. He has not previously held political office.

 

The politicing is not done yet, however. Landrieu recently challenged Cassidy to a series of six debates, one for each year she has been in office.

 

Political season is still here.

 

Email comments to jts040@latech.edu

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