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Keepin’ the video games for fun

October 16, 2014

 

Ellie Moslander
Associate Multimedia Editor

MOSLANDER

MOSLANDER

 

Growing up, I loved playing video games with my brother and our friends.  We grew up when video games were becoming a big deal.  I do not refer to myself as a gamer, but I do enjoy them. Games are fun, but honestly that is all they should be.

 

There is beginning to be a big push for “competitive gaming” as a sport, and this could start to take the fun out of these games.

 

Robert Morris University in Chicago began offering athletic scholarships for students who play the game “League of Legends.”

 

The idea behind this is that this game is a team sport, involving strategy techniques and the RMU associate athletics director, Kurt Melcher, said it shares elements with other sports.  The criteria for these scholarships will be based on students’ online rankings and footage of their gaming skills.

 

In a world becoming more and more technologically advanced, this may seem like a great idea and an innovative move into the future. But really, for me, it seems unnecessary.

 

Deeming it an athletic sport and offering thousands of dollars worth of scholarship money for it is fairly ridiculous. Even though the scholarships will be orchestrated with the intention of enticing more students to come to the school, it may be for the wrong reasons.

 

In my opinion, a lot of things we do for hobbies or leisure activities can be turned into a stressful activity driven by the mindset of work.

 

Stress is a part of life and does happen, but can be prevented with some things, video games being one. They were invented for fun and enjoyment and should stay that way.

 

It seems ridiculous that people can spend a majority of their time cooped up in front of a computer or TV screen playing these games and then receive a scholarship to do the same thing in college. Mainly, the fact that there are universities encouraging this is what seems odd.

 

Video games are not a bad thing, but they are not serious enough to go as far as to give out scholarships for and to be called a sport.

 

The definition of the word sport is a “physical activity” and really the only physical activity that occurs while playing video games is the movement of a person’s hands.

 

There has also been the argument about how video games may encourage people to become displaced from reality when played too much, and this can also be a concern.

 

The more universities focus on pleasing the students to entice them to attend college, the further away they can get from academics.

 

Ellie Moslander is a junior journalism major from Albuquerque, New Mexico, who serves as associate multimedia editor for the Tech Talk.  Email comments to emo012@latech.edu.

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