FacebookTwitterRSS

Building a brand

April 1, 2016

ELLIE MOSLANDER

Entertainment Editor | emo012@latech.edu

Stephanie Carwile, a professor of architecture, critiques students’ work. Photo by Devin Dronett

Stephanie Carwile, a professor of architecture, critiques students’ work.
Photo by Devin Dronett

 

 

 

In a collaborative effort to connect graphic design and interior design students while preparing students for professional practice, Marla Emory and Tom Futrell have designed a hands-on experience where these students work together to design and brand a restaurant.

 

 

Emory, an assistant professor and program chair for interior design and Futrell, an assistant professor and program chair for graphic design, worked directly with Cory Bahr, owner of the Cotton and Nona restaurants in Monroe, and Nick Oskoian, former chef for Nonna, as clients for the ART 413/INDESC 353 class.

 

 

“We met with [Bahr] to talk about possible collaborations for a restaurant to have graphic design and interior design students really think about all of the elements that are confined within the idea of a restaurant itself: the physical building, all of the branding, the menu, all of the physical pieces,” Futrell said.

 

Cotton, a restaurant owned by Cory Bahr, is one of the two restaurants the students worked with in the class.  Photo by Devin Dronett

Cotton, a restaurant owned by Cory Bahr, is one of the two restaurants the students worked with in the class.
Photo by Devin Dronett

The junior/senior level class, taught during the winter quarter, focuses on group dynamics dividing students into groups of both graphic and interior design students.

 

 

Emory said this is to develop concepts and find solutions, while working alongside designers with different skill sets.

 

 

“You’ve got these two planes that exist, so we’re dealing with several challenges,” she said. “One is even though they’re both designers they kind of speak a little bit of a different language. Where the graphic designers typically think two dimensionally and at a scale that can fit in an 11×17 printer and interior design students think more three dimensionally and at a larger scale.”

 

 

Futrell said the class is a quarter-long project made up of phases consisting of critiques from outside sources and clients and a final presentation.

 

Sydne Goldstein shows concept art for the future layout of Cotton restaurant. Photo by Devin Dronett

Sydne Goldstein shows concept art for the future layout of Cotton restaurant.
Photo by Devin Dronett

Both professors said the class gives students an idea of what work will be like in their career fields as they gain experience through working together with multiple people and skills.

 

 

“Why we’re excited about this class is because it gets as close to the real world practical experience as you can possibly have while still in the  safety and learning environment of school,” Futrell said.

 

 

Sydne Goldstein, a junior interior design major, and Adrienne Dailey, a graphic design major, worked together as a team in this class.

 

“This class impacts my academic career because now I have an amazing restaurant design to add to my portfolio, but I also have good branding items to add as well,” she said. “I also grew a lot as a designer because with interior design, we think very three dimensionally, but being paired with a graphic designer made me look at things two dimensionally and I learned a lot of valuable things from a graphic stand point.”

 

 

Goldstein said the class taught her skills she will use in her future career like how to work in groups and collaborate with other fields and going out of her comfort zone to accomplish things she had never done before.

 

 

“We went to the wood shop and cut our sign out of metal, and we planned out how the table would be set, we had to think of the overall experience from the second the customer walked in to the second they stepped out.,” she said. “This class took me out of my comfort zone and I believe I have become a better designer because of it. In my career, when I am asked to work with a group of people or asked to collaborate with someone, I will be confident in my ability to work with others because of my experience in this class.”

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *