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September 24, 2015

 

 

 

MATT VALCHO
Sports Editor

VALCHO

VALCHO

 

 

If you happened to watch any football over the first few weekends of the season, you probably noticed the seemingly endless number of ads from daily fantasy sports giants DraftKings and FanDuel.

 

In the past year, these two seemed to come out of nowhere. Football fans everywhere can’t go more than a few minutes without seeing one of the two plastered on their televisions.

 

ESPN has even started producing segments dedicated completely to daily fantasy on DraftKings.

 

This is because of the massive advertising deal that the two companies completed before the season. DraftKings has agreed to spend at least $250 million on advertisments to show on the ESPN family of networks and ABC during football broadcasts.

 

Long story short, you might not see the end of these ads anytime soon. I say might because the United States government has requested a hearing to determine the legality of daily fantasy sports for money.

 

Daily fantasy for cash works through a loophole in a law created by the federal government to outlaw sports betting.

 

Betting on sports was made illegal because of the widespread corruption that came with it (thanks a lot, Pete Rose). When the law was made, daily fantasy sports weren’t in existence.

 

The only issue I have with daily fantasy sports is how annoying their ads are. Honestly, I’m curious enough to try it myself. Unfortunately, there’s one problem.

 

Louisiana is one of five states in which daily fantasy games for cash or prizes are illegal.

 

Gambling is seemingly a part of the culture of Louisiana. That’s why I find it almost ironic that something that isn’t technically gambling is illegal.

 

Fantasy sports for money should not be illegal. When viewers have some investment in the games they’re watching, things tend to be a bit more interesting. If someone wants a chance to win a million dollars while enjoying a Sunday of football, why should anyone stop them?

 

As long as you play responsibly and don’t blow your life savings, there’s nothing wrong with making things even more entertaining. Without fantasy sports, what would we do with our lives?

 

Matt Valcho is a junior journalism major from Benton who serves as sports editor for The Tech Talk. Email comments to mvv002@latech.edu.

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