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‘Sluts’ parade in the streets

June 24, 2011

by Rebecca Spence, NEWS EDITOR

The SlutWalk has spread across the globe after its debut in Toronto, Canada in April 2011. No, this is not a song from some Canadian rap artist urging you to slut it out or Bernie to the bedroom. It is a well-organized walk where women of all backgrounds dress scandalously and walk down the street as a group, essentially giving a picture to the name of the movement.

Calling themselves Slutwalker, these feminists and women’s rights activists are parading their support for the freedom of being whoever they want to be, without judgment or fear of sexual assault.

These walks are about making a widely perceived negative term into a term of which no women should be ashamed.

According to the SlutWalk website, it all started Jan. 24,when a Toronto police representative was speaking to a group of college students and urged the women to “avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized.”

This statement got a rise out of feminists in the area who began claiming they had the right to dress promiscuously without being called sluts for it. If they did take part in sex for work or pleasure, then the walkers are saying “So what?” They should be able to live life how they want to live it.

Besides fighting for their right for foreplay, these women want to make sure the victims of sexual assault do not feel blamed for the horrors they have encountered.

Now part of me wants to say, “good for you” to these SlutWalkers. They are standing up for those victims of sexual assault, which is an admirable task.

But the realist in me wants to somewhat agree with the Toronto police representative.

I am not saying if you dress respectively that you will not get assaulted, I am simply sayin it could lower your chances.

Think about it, a Kate Middleton ensemble versus a Megan Fox get-up. If you put those two side-by-side, the one in the cut off jean skirt exposing more skin than you can imagine, (if you really cannot imagine it, just type in Megan Fox on Google) is going to provoke more sexual thoughts.

Is that not the goal though? Dressing provocatively for attention? No matter who you are, the person dressed the most scandalously is going to turn more heads every time, potential assaulters included. So should the victim get half of the blame?

The founders of SlutWalk express time and time again that victims should never be held responsible, no matter the circumstances. They believe that showing more than enough skin, getting highly intoxicated and engaging in sexual deeds are more than normal things for women of this modern age. Maybe it is more so than before, but I am still advocating common sense. As a human being, you have to be aware of your surroundings in order to survive and protect yourself, if you want to wear minimal clothes, I suggest going to your local swimming pool, where this kind of dress is appropriate.

Now, according to Dictionary.com, a slut is 1, a dirty, slovenly woman or 2, an immoral or dissolute woman; a prostitute, both negatively perceived definitions. In order to change the meaning of this one word from negative to positive will be a stretch, despite the art of seduction occurring at every SlutWalk.

So I have to wonder, are these feminists solely trying to boost the morale of the victims of sexual assault? Or are they actually using these walks as an excuse to dress more provocatively than normal in order to get the attention they crave?

So no, I am not, I repeat not, saying all victims are fully to blame. I am saying that as a woman, you can be aware of the consequences that may come with some of your actions.

There are many circumstances where assault happens, and it cannot be prevented in any way; this is tragic and happens more often than many Americans may expect. In reality, there are also many circumstances where assault is more likely to happen and what you wear, whom you talk to and the actions you take can either prevent or increase your chances of being assaulted.

If you want to join these feminists, the closest walk to us here in Louisiana takes place in Tennessee on Oct. 2, 2011. For more information on this topic and the reasoning behind SlutWalks, visit the founder’s website at www.slutwalktoronto.com.

    

Rebecca Spence is a junior journalism and speech communications major from Cypress, Texas, who serves as news editor for The Tech Talk. Email comments to res022@latech.edu.The SlutWalk has spread across the globe after its debut in Toronto, Canada in April 2011. No, this is not a song from some Canadian rap artist urging you to slut it out or Bernie to the bedroom. It is a well-organized walk where women of all backgrounds dress scandalously and walk down the street as a group, essentially giving a picture to the name of the movement.

Calling themselves Slutwalker, these feminists and women’s rights activists are parading their support for the freedom of being whoever they want to be, without judgment or fear of sexual assault.

These walks are about making a widely perceived negative term into a term of which no women should be ashamed.

According to the SlutWalk website, it all started Jan. 24,when a Toronto police representative was speaking to a group of college students and urged the women to “avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized.”

This statement got a rise out of feminists in the area who began claiming they had the right to dress promiscuously without being called sluts for it. If they did take part in sex for work or pleasure, then the walkers are saying “So what?” They should be able to live life how they want to live it.

Besides fighting for their right for foreplay, these women want to make sure the victims of sexual assault do not feel blamed for the horrors they have encountered.

Now part of me wants to say, “good for you” to these SlutWalkers. They are standing up for those victims of sexual assault, which is an admirable task.

But the realist in me wants to somewhat agree with the Toronto police representative.

I am not saying if you dress respectively that you will not get assaulted, I am simply sayin it could lower your chances.

Think about it, a Kate Middleton ensemble versus a Megan Fox get-up. If you put those two side-by-side, the one in the cut off jean skirt exposing more skin than you can imagine, (if you really cannot imagine it, just type in Megan Fox on Google) is going to provoke more sexual thoughts.

Is that not the goal though? Dressing provocatively for attention? No matter who you are, the person dressed the most scandalously is going to turn more heads every time, potential assaulters included. So should the victim get half of the blame?

The founders of SlutWalk express time and time again that victims should never be held responsible, no matter the circumstances. They believe that showing more than enough skin, getting highly intoxicated and engaging in sexual deeds are more than normal things for women of this modern age. Maybe it is more so than before, but I am still advocating common sense. As a human being, you have to be aware of your surroundings in order to survive and protect yourself, if you want to wear minimal clothes, I suggest going to your local swimming pool, where this kind of dress is appropriate.

Now, according to Dictionary.com, a slut is 1, a dirty, slovenly woman or 2, an immoral or dissolute woman; a prostitute, both negatively perceived definitions. In order to change the meaning of this one word from negative to positive will be a stretch, despite the art of seduction occurring at every SlutWalk.

So I have to wonder, are these feminists solely trying to boost the morale of the victims of sexual assault? Or are they actually using these walks as an excuse to dress more provocatively than normal in order to get the attention they crave?

So no, I am not, I repeat not, saying all victims are fully to blame. I am saying that as a woman, you can be aware of the consequences that may come with some of your actions.

There are many circumstances where assault happens, and it cannot be prevented in any way; this is tragic and happens more often than many Americans may expect. In reality, there are also many circumstances where assault is more likely to happen and what you wear, whom you talk to and the actions you take can either prevent or increase your chances of being assaulted.

If you want to join these feminists, the closest walk to us here in Louisiana takes place in Tennessee on Oct. 2, 2011. For more information on this topic and the reasoning behind SlutWalks, visit the founder’s website at www.slutwalktoronto.com.

Rebecca Spence is a junior journalism and speech communications major from Cypress, Texas, who serves as news editor for The Tech Talk. Email comments to res022@latech.edu.

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