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Shane & Shane shake Temple

February 29, 2008

by Meredith Maines

Shane & Shane’s Vision of You tour rolled into Temple Baptist Church Feb. 20, showcasing the musical talents of Shane Barnard and Shane Everett, Starfield, Bethany Dillon and speaker David Nasser.

Jake Dugard, a junior communication design major, was one of an estimated 800 people who attended the concert.

“[Shane & Shane] blew me away,” Dugard said.

Bethany Dillon opened the festivities, introducing herself simply as Beth. She mixed her breathy voice with a melody on acoustic guitar for a few songs, including “All I Need.” These lyrics from her debut album, Dillon said, still correct her spiritual posture from time to time. She was then joined by her fiancé, Barnard, and his band members to sing duet-style.

The relaxed atmosphere continued with songs from Barnard’s acoustic guitar and vocals, accompanied by Everett’s acute harmonies.

Dugard said seeing and hearing the songs performed live made him want to revisit the Shanes’ album.

“I really want to go back and listen to the lyrics,” he said.

Some of the lyrics scrolled on a panoramic backdrop while the band performed, with phrases like “my happiness is found in less of me and more of You,” from the Shanes’ song “The Answer.” The duo also performed “Burn Us Up,” “Psalm 13” and “Embracing Accusation.”

Starfield, a Canadian band with a rock sound, followed up with songs from their sophomore CD, “Beauty in the Broken,” and their newest recording, “I Will Go,” set to release later in 2008. They bear the Shanes’ stamp of approval as the first rock band with whom the two have wanted to tour. Lead singer, Tim Neufeld, said sharing the stage with Shane & Shane was like winning a contest, confessing the band is their biggest fans.

But the concert wasn’t just about music, said Kevin Inman, director of the Baptist Collegiate Ministry.

“This is much more than a concert. We want [students] to be challenged,” Inman said.

And concert-goers were challenged by Nasser to pray in pairs for selected children from World Vision’s sponsorship program. Then students were invited to commit to providing a monthly payment toward a specific child’s food and education.

Students from Tech, Monroe, Pineville and Longview, Texas, all bowed heads and hearts to petition the plight of starvation before the God they serve.

After the concert, Barnard, Everett and Nasser shared their thoughts on the tour:

Q: Do you treat each concert as a worship experience?

Barnard:
Eighty percent of the time we have a wrong heart, maybe even a trite heart. After a decade of playing concerts, what we lean on is that what we’re saying is true. The repetition in my life has been huge. [It’s] the biggest anchor in my life. [The lyrics] turn into vocabulary.

Everett:
We’re definitely a work in progress. Sometimes it feels monotonous. We can hold the Scripture out and let it do what it does. The reality is true that hopefully we’re a beautiful picture of the Lord.

Nasser:
We will never be prepared. We’ve never walked in and said ‘we’re 100-percent prepared.’ The Lord somehow, despite us, does great things.

Q: How does being on tour affect your spiritual growth?

Nasser:
On the road, [it’s] easier to be consistent. It’s a lot easier than the real world.

Barnard:
If the Lord gives you time, you have to be super disciplined. It’s easy to let the day wash on by.

Q: How does touring affect your family and friendships?

Nasser:
It’s tough. If it wasn’t for the call on our lives, we would get a local gig. There has to be a cause for missing birthdays and ballet recitals.

Q: What is different about performing in a college town?

Nasser:
There is something about the small city. [The concert is] the big event. There’s something beautiful about 800 people gathering in Ruston.

Barnard:
You’re going to a community. In Dallas, it’s no matter for people to drive an hour to get there.

Q: What music inspires you stylistically and spiritually?

Barnard:
I don’t listen to much music. I listen to a lot of sermons. I get more inspiration from preaching than music.

Everett:
If I’m out driving and the days are so full, listening to music doesn’t happen.

After leaving Ruston, the tour traveled on to Pensacola, Fla., and will end March 15 in Marion, Ill.

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