FacebookTwitterRSS

Let’s keep killing each other

April 23, 2008

by Mandy Thomas

Something is wrong. Something is very wrong. Something is very wrong with us. With me and everyone I know. People my age – my generation.

The cause? I don’t know. But shouldn’t we try to figure it out? Instead of killing each other?

Is the cause too much pressure? Pressure from parents, boyfriends, teachers and bosses? Pressure from our peers? Better yet – are we putting too much pressure on ourselves?

Could it be blanket unhappiness? But what would be causing our depression?

Insecurities? Instability? Divorce and death?
Are we trying to make a statement? Send a message? What message? What statement? What is it that we can’t say with words? That we have to chose death instead. That our only answer is murder.

How do we correct the problem? Some people think we should fight back. Fight violence with violence. Allow concealed weapons on campus. Add to the confusion. Add to the fatalities.

Do we really think this will work? We should ask the people who’ve already committed the murders what they think. Ask them if they would have killed all those people if they knew other students might be carrying concealed weapons. Too bad we can’t. Most of them killed themselves.

Well, let’s ask the future shooters what they think. Ask those students who are planning a killing spree if this new law will make them think twice. Too bad we don’t know who those future killers are.

The funny thing is, back in 2002, the U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Department of Education conducted research in hopes of establishing a profile for these on-campus killers.

In a report titled “The Final Report and Findings of the Safe School Initiative: Implications for the Prevention of School Attacks in the United States,” the researchers analyzed 37 incidents of targeted school violence.

Naturally, the only profile these researchers could come up with was that there is no profile.

Page 19 of the report states, “There is no accurate or useful ‘profile’ of students who engaged in targeted school violence.”
What they did find was “almost three-quarters of the attackers felt persecuted, bullied, threatened, attacked or injured by others prior to the incident.”

So let me get this straight – I’ve been putting myself in danger? By being intolerant and judgmental I’ve actually been increasing my chances of getting blasted during my daily walk through the Quad.

Karma is one powerful force. I wonder if its course can ever be set straight. I suppose it’s up to me. And up to you.

Otherwise, we’ll just keep killing each other.

Mandy Thomas is a senior journalism major from Shreveport who serves as associate editor for The Tech Talk. E-mail comments to ajt008@latech.edu.

Share