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“A … My Name Is Alice”; Not just for women

November 5, 2015

 

The cast of “A...My Name Is Alice” acts out the song “All Girl Band.”-Photo by Colin Fontenot

The cast of “A…My Name Is Alice” acts out the song “All Girl Band.”-Photo by Colin Fontenot

 

REBEKAH BARNES

Staff Reporter | reb033@latech.edu

 

The opening night of Louisiana Tech’s production of “A … My Name is Alice” was effortlessly and laugh-out-loud funny.

 

From cheating boyfriends and catcalling construction workers, to friendships and sisterhood, “A … My Name is Alice” encompasses so many different facets of womanhood in an unabashed style.

 

“A … My Name is Alice” is a musical revue, conceived in 1983 by Joan Micklin Silver and Julianne Boyd.

 

It contains sketches, monologues and music, and instead of following a story line, it focuses on the themes of women’s strengths and differences.

 

Director Cherrie Sciro said she chose the play because the theater department has such a strong group of women this season.

Michelle Dormaier performs the monologue “For Women Only.”-Photo by Colin Fontenot

Michelle Dormaier performs the monologue “For Women Only.”-Photo by Colin Fontenot

 

“I don’t think there’s enough out there that shows how strong women are or our integrity and growth,” Sciro said.

 

Purple and lavender drapes hang above the Stone Theater stage, with a band composed entirely of women situated behind purple raised platforms.

 

The opening song and dance features women who find empowerment despite self-doubt, work and motherhood by joining an all-girl band.

 

The women introduce themselves as Alice in the style of a child’s ABC game for which the play is named: “A … my name is Alice, and my husband’s name is Adam, and his girlfriend’s name is Amy, and my lover’s name is Abby…”

 

The show balances amusing songs and monologues with heartfelt refrains about relationships.

 

Following the first number is a duet between a 15-year-old girl going on her first date and a widow going on her first blind date after 35 years of marriage.

 

They both experience some of the same fears even thought they are at different stages in life.

 

Between moments of absurd humor and relatable rants, the play includes social commentary.

 

One song highlights a teacher telling a hard-working mother that her daughter is a nuisance because she is self-assured and learning beyond her grade level.

 

One of the women on stage was Olivia Willcox, a sophomore theater major. She said her favorite number is “Friends,” which depicts a friendship between two girls developing over time, and how they lean on each other through their struggles.

 

“Once you leave a stage, you know how strong it was,” Willcox said. “Theater is important because it touches people. Whether you’re performing or watching, it changes lives.”

 

Candace Casey said this was her first time to see a Tech production.

 

The freshman family and consumer sciences education major said she recommends the play to everyone, especially men.

 

“There doesn’t have to be this division between gender, age or race,” Casey said. “All the personalities on stage were so relatable and fun to see.”

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